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Poster: Skip Elsheimer Date: Dec 5, 2004 1:29am
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: Is Night of the Living Dead complete?

The film is complete. If you look at the thumbnails from the film (which are automatically derived from the MPEG-2 file), you'll see that the film is complete all the way to the end credits.

The user probably had some downloading problems and he had been erroneously informed by his browser or download agent software that the file was complete.

This file has been downloaded several thousand times without complaint.

Skip

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Poster: Cey Date: Dec 5, 2004 3:07am
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: Is Night of the Living Dead complete?

I figured a lot of people had downloaded it and that it was probably okay, but I also thought that at some point the copy on the server might have been damaged.

That it used to be okay but that it no longer was.

Frankly, with Archive.org doing so many multi-gig files, I'm surprised they haven't yet added BitTorrent downloads.

The torrent could automatically redirect to a server with bandwidth still available.

And BitTorrent's built in checksum ability guarantees a good download.

And there are plenty of bitTorrent clients, including one in Java. So those that want to do a torrent could do so, while others did it the normal download way.

(Another thing they might want to someday consider is using a web based Java based player. So that way people could watch a mpeg-4 or Theora stream without installing any special software. Or an activeX based Divx player. Or...)

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Poster: simon c Date: Dec 5, 2004 4:23am
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: Is Night of the Living Dead complete?

I believe that the Archive has discussed doing BitTorrents at several junctures, but it's not spectacularly easy to heavily automate BitTorrents over massive amounts of files - also, torrents are great when you have a small amount of very popular files, but when you have a massive amount of files, and people aren't always downloading the same ones at the same time, it gets trickier - perhaps you could choose a Top 10 to torrent, but that's more of a manual task than an automated one. I don't know if it's come up again recently, though, and I'm not speaking officially for the Archive here - that's just the last thing I heard.

Anyhow, at one point I had Night of the Living Dead on my independent legal BitTorrent site, LegalTorrents (http://www.legaltorrents.com), but I removed it when I decided that we would only have explicitly Creative Commons-licensed torrents on there - there's nothing wrong with it, though!

A couple of other Archive-related files are still on LegalTorrents, though, including a DivX version of Rick Prelinger's excellent CC-licensed 'Panorama Ephemera'.

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Poster: Cey Date: Dec 5, 2004 4:35am
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: Is Night of the Living Dead complete?

##
but it's not spectacularly easy to heavily automate BitTorrents over massive amounts of files
##

Well, the only ones really needed are the larger files. Say, above 500megs.

Those are the ones most likely to have errors during download. I'm really thinking more along the lines of BitTorrent's highly effective error checking and recovery ability than anything else. MD5 and SHA-1 etc. are nice to verify a completely downloaded file, but useless for error recovery!

The 'sharing' part of BitTorrent would be a complete waste of time for Archive.org, BUT the torrent redirect part could be useful because it could automatically redirect the user's download to an available server. To balance the load.

But that would be optional. To me, the important part would be the error detection & correction.

Back in my days of doing dial-up modem, I several times got damaged .ISO even though I was downloading from an official linux mirror. It's a whole lotta fun to redownload just because a couple of bytes got damaged.

Even though I'm on broadband now, downloading 4g movies are still a lot of time and bandwidth.

As to automating the creation of the <1000 torrents... That I don't know. There are probably tools, but it's definetly not something I've ever checked into.

If there was some other (java based?) download program that could download like normal and do error recovery based on a file with a collection of md5's in it (say every 1 meg), then that would work just as well with no change to Archive.org (other than an automatic creation of error detection files with md5's in them.) But I don't know of any program that does that.